Category Archives: Schools, Parks, Recreation

Get Involved! Help The New Playground At Bethune Day Academy Become A Reality

KaBoom! Playground under construction. Photo courtesy of the West Orlando News Online.
KaBoom! Playground under construction. Photo courtesy of the West Orlando News Online.

For about a year now I have heard neighbors complain about the playground at the Mary McLeod Bethune Day Academy off Irving St. between 13th and 14th. The old playground was rusted and in pretty bad condition, to the point that neighbors were making small fixes on the equipment themselves. The good news is that the old playground has been removed in preparation for the construction on a new one! But, a lot of organizing and food and monetary donations are needed ahead of the May 15th build day. We caught up with Matt Grimison, an organizer who is helping making this new playground a reality, and asked him about the project.

How did this playground replacement project come to be?

About a year ago a group of neighbors who live nearby started looking into the playground and the potential of getting it updated. The main early issue was jurisdiction, since figuring out who actually owned and controlled the playground was baffling. Mary Mcleod Bethune Day Academy is a public charter school that leases the old Slowe school building from the city. There is also the Advisory Neighborhood Commission 5B building on the site of the old playground, so that further muddied the waters. After meeting with school officials we figured out the jurisdiction and the fact that the school had authority through the lease. The ball started rolling pretty quickly after making that determination, and school founder Dr. Linda McKay put the playground upgrade on the school’s front burner. During the collaboration among neighbors and school officials someone mentioned KaBOOM!, so the group started looking into their program.
 
One aside is that the ANC trailer on the grounds is in deplorable condition, with sharp rusted sheet metal protruding from the base and broken glass often strewn about, creating an unsafe play environment. We would love to see it moved, but that, unfortunately, is not part of the playground project right now.
What exactly is KaBOOM!?
KaBOOM! is an incredible D.C.-based national nonprofit that works to promote play for children. One thing they do is pair communties like ours with foundations and corporate sponsors to build playgrounds.  Back in March, we asked kids to draw us their ideas for their dream playgrounds and we used those as inspiration for the design of our new playground. With a KaBOOM! project, the school and community work hands on – literally – in planning and building the playground, culminating in a single Build Day where the equipment is installed by volunteers. Not only does this approach make the resulting playground a real community/school endeavor, but it slices through red tape and makes the quick project timetable possible.
 
The sponsor for the Mary McLeod Bethune Day Academy playground is The J. Willard and Alice S. Marriott Foundation. They not only financially contributing, but about 100 Marriott employees are volunteering on site as part of Marriott’s Global Day of Service. They’re commitment to this project has been mind-blowing, and we are really appreciative of everything they are doing.
Will the playground be open to the general public or just for the school kids?
This is a true community/school partnership, and the playground will be open to the public. We are also looking for interested members of the community who can help maintain the playground and new landscaping after installation, as well as develop and offer programing, working in concert with the school.
 How can the community help make the new playground a reality?
We are about three weeks from Build Day, and there is a lot to be done! Any help from our awesome Brookland neighbors would be greatly appreciated. The most pressing need is fundraising. The project requires about $9,000 in contributions from the community and school to make it a reality. We have a little money raised so far, but need a lot more in a little amount of time! Anyone interested in donating a few bucks can do so really easily here. Donations are tax deductible.
 
We also need donations of food and beverages for the Build Day since we need to take care of 250 volunteers for breakfast and lunch over three days. Anyone interested in contributing in this area can contact Rani Harrison (Brookland resident and MMBDA mom) at rani1(at)us(dot)ibm(dot)com as soon as possible. Another neighbor, Joe Finley at joefinleyiii(at)gmail(dot)com is coordinating tool donations – we need them for just a couple of days and will return them to you! We need lots of wheelbarrows and shovels.
 
As May 15 gets closer we will share information on how neighbors can volunteer. Because the build day is so intensive and involves so many people, volunteers must be registered before the event and check in when they arrive. Unfortunately, drop-ins can’t be accommodated. We are assessing how many volunteers we will need and will reach out to the community when that is completed. Volunteer information will also be available at the school’s website.
 
This project shows what is possible when our great Brookland community comes together with the help of great organizations and sponsors.

Reminder: Time Running Out To Give Your Middle School/Turkey Thicket Feedback – Here’s How

Community Center Brookland NE Washington DC
Turkey Thicket Exterior Photo Courtesy of DC Dept. of Public Works

We have covered the debate over the location of the new Brookland Middle School extensively here, here and here. Last Saturday morning the DC Department of General Services (DSG) presented the final four options for the location of the middle school.  Here is where you come in. The DGS will be making their decision on the site location for the school in the next week. If you want to voice your opinion on this decision – you have until the end of this week to do so. Here are some easy options to do so:

  • This survey put together by a group of neighbors. The results of this vote will be submitted to the DC Department of General Services, Ward 5 Councilman Kenyan McDuffie, and all other relevant government officials in order to give these officials a clearer understanding of the community’s preference.
  • DGS is asking that the community email Darrell Pressley, their press secretary, at darrell(dot)pressley(at)dc(dot)gov
  • View the presentation from DGS that gives a rundown of the options here. There is a form at the end of the presentation where you can give your feedback directly to DGS

For our rundown of the options check out our posting here.

Decision Time – DGS Needs Your Input On The Location Of The New Brookland Middle School

We have covered the debate over the location of the new Brookland Middle School extensively here, here and here. On Saturday morning the DC Department of General Services (DSG) presented the final four options for the location of the middle school to a highly engaged crowd of over 100 residents. (See the presentation here.) While there are still a lot of valid questions as to why, some decisions have been made and DGS made it clear that they are not going to entertain revisiting them. These are:

  • The school will be built by summer 2014 to house 540 Ward 5 middle school students
  • It will be built somewhere on the property where Turkey Thicket and the now defunct Brookland Elementary school resides
  • Thanks toWard 5 Councilmember Kenyan McDuffie , and you, the 280 people who signed our petition, the option of co-locating the Middle School and Turkey Thicket is off the table. Yay!

Here is where you come in. The DGS will be making their decision on the site location for the school in the next two weeks. If you want to voice your opinion on this decision – you have one week to do so. DGS is asking that the community email Darrell Pressley, their press secretary, at darrell(dot)pressley(at)dc(dot)gov, to give your feedback on what you think the best option is. One thing to note, DGS representative Kenny Diggs stated at the meeting that the project budget will be the heaviest weighted criteria for the decision at a factor of 70% of the decision.  So we decided to post the options from most expensive to least expensive. The project budget is $50 million, with $38 million for construction and the rest for “soft costs” like equipment, utility fees, etc. As far as we can tell, the only option that will not require an increase to the project budget is the last option listed here. (Full disclosure – in our opinion, there weren’t enough details provided to make a fully informed decision, so these pros and cons are ours alone based on what we have gathered. Click on the diagrams for an enlarged view.)

South Plan TT BMS

What we are calling it: School at south end of the property. Perhaps, just perhaps, this may be the best for all residents overall because it is near commercial property instead of houses, but we are wondering what happened to the drop off/pick up zone that was included in earlier versions of this idea, in the way of a “new” street alongside the school. Maybe that whole lotta above-ground parking lot will be used as a defacto pickup/drop off zone?

Pros: Allows the different populations to have their own space, school parking lot may be able to be used by the community, closest to the Metro.

Cons: Most expensive, playground plans will have to be reconfigured and looks squished in (perhaps due to the above ground parking by the school), and all outside amenities like the tennis courts will be closed during construction, less green space, 10th Street NE traffic issues.

TT BMS Stand alone option

What we are calling it:  Quasi Co-locationish. We are wondering if this option won’t pose a lot of the same issues co-location brought up. Meh.

Pros: Gives the middle schoolers better access to amenities and it looks like the school has a nice sized footprint. We are assuming this option comes with underground parking since we don’t see any new above-ground parking lots.

Cons: Second most expensive, less green space, the palyground will have to be reconfigured and all outside amenities like the tennis courts will be closed during construction, serious 10th Street NE traffic issues.

 

Expanded BMS Site

 What we are calling it:  Expanded Footprint. This option keeps the school on the footprint of the current Brookland Elementary School but expands it a bit to the west and adds an above ground parking lot. The presentation says there is “no drop-off to offset street traffic” on Michigan avenue, although there is something depicted with an arrow that looks like a pick-up/drop off zone, and we wonder if the parking lot to the west of the school won’t be used as a de facto pick-up/drop off zone anyway.

Pros: Gives the different populations their own spaces, the school (we hope) will have the adequate space needed to accommodate the student body.

Cons: Third most expensive, less green space, playground plan will have to be reconfigured and all outside amenities like the tennis courts will be closed during construction, although with less of an impact than the previous two options. We are assuming there will be no underground parking since an above-ground parking lot is added. May result in the loss of two tennis courts.

Current Footprint BMS

 What we are calling it:  Existing Footprint. This option keeps the school on the footprint of the current Brookland Elementary School and adds an above ground parking lot. This is the only plan that is projected to stay within budget.

Pros: The playground will go ahead as planned, there will be a drop off/pick up zone in the “drive” that runs alongside the back of the school, no construction related closures to Turkey Thicket or the grounds.

Cons: Increased traffic on Shepherd Street, we wonder if this provides adequate space for the 540 middle schoolers, and enough parking.

Think We Deserve A Great Middle School, Recreation Center And Playground? Sign Here!

Community Center Brookland NE Washington DC
Turkey Thicket Exterior Photo Courtesy of DC Dept. of Public Works

Last week we posted about the ongoing concerns surrounding the proposed co-location of the future Brookland Middle School and the Turkey Thicket Recreation Center. There will be another community meeting to discuss these plans this Thursday March 14th at 6:30 at Turkey Thicket. Our concern, based on the rancor and confusion of the last community meeting we attended, is that instead of building consensus, the various segments of the community wound up pitted against each other. It doesn’t have to be this way. We have done a lot of thinking about this issue and talked with neighbors of all demographics in Brookland and Michigan Park.  We heard the same thing echoed over and over again – why can’t we have a great middle school, keep our well used recreation center in tact, and have the great community playground that up until last week was on the cusp of breaking ground? This need not be an either/or scenario. Don’t we deserve a solution that works for all segments of our diverse neighborhood? We propose that the community come together and state to the Departments of Parks and Recreation (DPR), General Services (DGS) and DC Public Schools (DCPS) very plainly what we do want, and allow this to frame the discussion going forward. Here are 4 broad points, that we feel would be a great starting point. If you agree with us, please sign the petition below and we promise to bring your collective voice to the meeting this Thursday.

1) We want to maintain Turkey Thicket Recreation Center as is – a well used, much-needed amenity valued by and accessible to the entire community. Co-location concepts that turn the Recreation Center into an adjunct of the Brookland Middle School and/or limit or eliminate community access to it are unacceptable.

2) We want the plans for the Turkey Thicket Playground renovation to go forth as planned, and budgeted for in the Request For Proposals (RFP) for this project, as part of the Mayor’s PlayDC initiative, with delivery of the new playground by summer 2013. This playground will serve the whole community as much-needed multigenerational gathering space and concepts to relocate, reduce or reconfigure its amenities are unacceptable.

3) We want a state-of-the-art Brookland Middle School with dedicated facilities that meet the program needs defined by the Brookland School Improvement Team (SIT) and DCPS.  We understand that the new Middle School students should benefit from their proximity to the Recreation Center and we believe that agreements can be reached that will reasonably accommodate the school, playground and recreation center on one campus. The continued marginalization of Ward 5 middle school students is unacceptable.

4) We want a broader voice in the planning of the Middle School, so that stakeholders affected can be represented, including residents who live in close proximity to the proposed school and users of Turkey Thicket and the future playground. The Ward 5 Council on Education and the Brookland School Improvement Team (SIT) have been working very hard with the city for over a year on the plans for the new school, however, developing plans for this important  amenity without the input of the whole community is unacceptable.

If you agree with the above 4 points, then we kindly ask that you take a few minutes to complete the petition below by noon Thursday March 14th. Your email and home address will not be used in any way other than to demonstrate the collective strength in numbers we have for a win-win whole community solution to our neighborhood’s needs.

[emailpetition id=”1″]

Turkey Thicket And Brookland Middle School – So Many Questions, So Few Answers

Readers, it has been challenging to capture the various moving parts of this latest neighborhood kerfuffle succinctly, but I have tried.  The existing Brookland Elementary School building located at 1150 Michigan Avenue, NE has been shuttered since 2008, and will either be torn down or refurbished and reopened by summer 2014 as the Brookland Middle School. The overall budget for this project is $50 Million dollars. Last week, we attended a meeting where plans to create one campus of the Turkey Thicket Recreation Center and the new Brookland Middle School were discussed. The meeting was attended by over 70 very vocal Brookland and North Michigan Park residents. I went into the meeting hopeful that the community would realize a win-win scenario where the best features of this new school and our fully used recreation center could be leveraged in a way that benefits with whole community. I was apparently too optimistic. Here are birdseye views of the current buildings and the plans presented by the Department of General Services at the meeting.

image

image

The meeting quickly devolved into a two-hour-long, tense series of exchanges between the community and representatives from the Departments of Parks and Recreation (DPR), General Services (DGS) and DC Public Schools (DCPS). The reason why, in short, is because the plan presented for the new school amounted to short-changing the future middle school kids and the loss of currently used community facilities. Here is what I found most frustrating about the meeting:

1) There were no substantive answers given to basic questions and concerns raised by the community. We were essentially told that important details that need to be thought out now would be resolved at some unspecified time in the future.

2) There was either a lack of community involvement in these plans, or where there was involvement, those stakeholders were completely blindsided by new plans. For example, the Ward 5 Council on Education and the Brookland School Improvement Team (SIT) have been working with the city for over a year on the plans for the new school. So you could imagine their surprise when the plans shown at the meeting were not the ones they have been working on, but a completely new concept they had not seen yet. We were told that the plans presented are not definite, but DPS, DGS and DCPS were not prepared to discuss other options at the meeting. The Request For Proposals (RFP), for the design of the new school states that “…outdoor spaces will be shared with the city recreation facility. Those spaces include a multi-purpose soccer field and tennis courts. In return, the community will have access to the middle school’s gymnasium during evenings and weekends.” Because the only gymnasium in the plan presented was the one currently belonging to Turkey Thicket, I am concluding that the gymnasium will change ownership and now belong to the school, and the community will lose this much-needed and heavily used amenity.

3) There were no definitive answers given about potential changes to plans to overhaul the Turkey Thicket Playground, which seemed imminent, and construction slated to begin in weeks. The RFP for this project has long been out, and Studio 39 was hired to develop concept plans, with expected delivery of the new playground by summer 2013. The new school plans presented showed the school sitting atop what would be the new playground and the elements of the playground overhaul in a different configuration on the property than what is currently planned.

As of now, there is a lot up in the air, a lot at stake, and few clear answers. Here are the biggest outstanding issues, as we see them, which were not addressed at the meeting:

  • School security requirements vs. community access. If the school and Turkey Thicket are to be one campus, how will the different populations served by the two interact, be restricted, etc?
  • Status of the Turkey Thicket playground overhaul. If the plan presented goes through, will we still get the same playground amenities as currently planned? Since the planning for the new middle school has been going on for a year and a half, why has there been no coordination between these two projects and RFPs? What will happen to the funding allocated for the playground overhaul as part of the Mayor’s PlayDC project? How will this playground, geared significantly towards toddlers, function in the same space with middle school students who are teenagers?
  • Accommodating the whole community. Brookland and the surrounding areas are growing quickly. As it stands now, Turkey Thicket fields and facilities are used not only by the general community, but also by charter schools and other groups. Since this amenity is used at or near capacity already, shouldn’t the plans accommodate growth and be a scaled upward not downward?
  • Parking and Traffic. The school, as planned, will serve 540 students. Traffic on 10th Street NE and Michigan Ave NE is pretty congested already in the mornings and afternoons. There has been no traffic study done because of the stage this project is in, fine, but there also hasn’t been any outreach to the neighbors that live on 10th Street where the proposed pick up and drop off points are. If an entirely new school is to be built why not have underground parking?

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Since the meeting, concerned citizens have been raising awareness wherever they can in order to get some answers, and hopefully, a new plan. We reached out to Tom Bridge, president of the Brookland Neighborhood Civic Association and here’s what he had to say:

“BNCA’s leadership is significantly concerned with the DGS/DPR/DCPS plan to co-locate the Brookland Middle School and Turkey Thicket Recreation Center. At this time, we are lacking the detail to make good judgments concerning this plan, and that by itself is concerning to us. Turkey Thicket is a multi-generational facility at the heart of the community, and plans to alter that space need to be detailed to the community before any progress is made toward a final plan.”

Ward 5 Councilmember Kenyan McDuffie made a statement on the Brookland listserv, here is an outtake

“I was dismayed by the recent announcement by the Department of General Services (DGS) to co-locate the new Brookland Middle School with the Turkey Thicket Recreation Center without community input. I share the outrage the Ward 5 Council on Education expressed regarding the lack of transparency and inclusion of stakeholders in this new design. While our community is in dire need of the proposed middle school, it should not come at the expense of another well used amenity.”

We couldn’t agree more. Two days after the community meeting CM McDuffie questioned the collocation plans at the Committee on Government Operations, agency performance oversight hearing for DGS. It is hoped that McDuffie’s involvement and the amount of public outcry will spur DGS to involve the community more fully and revisit earlier proposals that did not combine the two buildings. We are in touch with the Ward 5 Council on Education who will provide us with an update and next steps to pass along to you; but for now you can remain involved in the process by contacting our elected officials such as Councilmembers and Advisory Neighborhood Commissioners, support the Ward 5 Council on Education and the SIT, and engage with the Brookland Neighborhood Civic Association and the Michigan Park Citizens Association (MPCA).  This topic will be discussed at a MPCA meeting tomorrow evening, Tuesday, March 5th at 7:15 pm, at Bunkerhill Elementary School, located at 14th Street & Michigan Avenue NE.

Noyes Playground Construction Update – Groundbreaking Soon

We learned the latest on the Noyes Playground overhaul from Jackie Stanley of DC’s Department of General Services (DGS). A construction fence will go up next week, and construction will start 2 weeks later. Construction is expected to last 12 weeks, with a target completion date of June 1st. There will be a groundbreaking ceremony, but a date hasn’t been set yet.

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The park will have the following features:

  • Playground for all ages
  • Adult fitness equipment
  • Plaza/Community gathering space
  • Community garden
  • Walking path
  • Multipurpose field
  • Perimeter fencing
  • Ornamental playground fencing
  • Picnic tables
  • Landscaping
  • Grills
  • Service entrance
  • Litter receptacles
  • Community message board
  • Irrigation system

The budget for the project is $1 million dollars, the contract to construct the park came in at $725,000, leaving the remaining funds for contingency purposes. Of note, there has been some hand wringing over the center play area which will be artificial turf rather than natural grass. The Brookland Neighborhood Civic Association even weighed in on it with  letter to DGS, asking them to reconsider. DGS is going forward with the plans for the turf, citing studies that don’t find safety issues, and claiming that maintenance is easier. Ms. Stanley also noted that the city in general is moving away from grass and to artificial turf for high traffic playground areas. More information on this project is available here at DGS.gov.  Noyes Park is located at 10th and Franklin Street, NE.

Raise Your Voice – Make The Brookland Middle School And Turkey Thicket Play Nicely Together

Aquatic Center Brookland NE Washington DC
Turkey Thicket Swimming Pool

Can a great recreation center that serves the wider community and a great school coexist happily side by side? We certainly hope so. We have been following the overhaul of the Turkey Thicket playground over the last few months. With the city issuing a Request For Proposals (RFP) for the Turkey Thicket playground improvements on January 3rd, the project seemed imminent. However, adjacent to Turkey Thicket is the old Brookland Elementary School, that the DC Department of General Services (DSG) is going to tear down this year to build a new school – the Brookland Middle School. Right now, the DGS and DC Public Schools (DCPS) are in the concept phase for the design and construction of the school. As part of this exercise, they, along with the Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR), are considering creating a joint property out of Turkey Thicket and the school property. Clearly, Turkey Thicket has many assets: the swimming pool, 90′ diamond baseball field, basketball court, gymnasium, multipurpose rooms, playground, and tennis courts. All of these would be huge assets to attract students to the school. But what about the needs of the wider community? At this point, it is not entirely clear what the consequences of this joint property concept are. How would this concept affect the community’s access to this much-needed, and used, recreation center? How will this plan, if enacted, affect the plans in place for the playground overhaul? The middle school is supposed to house 300 – 600 students.  What is the plan to deal with parking and additional traffic? Bottom line: will this mean a loss of neighborhood amenities or a chance for us to get expanded and better facilities?

DGS, DCPS and DPR are seeking community feedback on this co-location idea at a meeting called by ANC Commissioner Jenese Jones (of the 5B05 SMD) on Tuesday February 26th, 6:30 at Turkey Thicket. This decision will have a large and lasting impact on the quality of life in our neighborhood and the attractiveness of Brookland to potential new neighbors, so I encourage folks to come out and discuss what the implications are. Perhaps I am too optimistic, but I see the potential for win-win here, but we all know that only squeaky wheels get (and in this case, keep) the grease. Turkey Thicket Recreation Center is located at 1100 Michigan Avenue, NE.

Woodridge Library Celebrates Black History Month With A Variety Of Programs

Woodridge Library. Image courtesy of DC Public Library.
Woodridge Library. Image courtesy of DC Public Library.

As usual, the Woodridge Library has a lot of activities going on that appeal to a wide array of people and ages. This month there is an extra emphasis on African-American history programs in celebration of Black History Month. Here is a rundown:

  • PC Basics, February 7th, 2:00 pm
  • Reading Notes: Violin Lessons with a Reading Flair, February 9th, 3:30 pm
  • The Smithsonian Presents Mission:Preservation, February 11th, 1:00 pm
  • Teen Trivia: African and African-American Who’s Who,  February 11th and 25th, 3:30 pm
  • Black History Month Film Festival, February 11th, 6:300 pm
  • I <3 Books, February 13, 4:00 pm
  • C.R. Gibbs African Culture and History Lecture Series – African Genesis: The Rise of Humanity in Africa, February 6th, 7:00 pm 
  • C.R. Gibbs African Culture and History Lecture Series – Black Miners: A Buried Legacy, February 13th, 7:00 pm
  • C.R. Gibbs African Culture and History Lecture Series – Great Black Women, February 20th, 7:00 pm
  • C.R. Gibbs African Culture and History Lecture Series – Let Your Motto Be Resistance: Great Slave Revolts, February 27th, 7:00 pm
  • Job Seekers Drop In Clinic, Every Tuesday, 10:00 am
  • Preschool Story Time, Every Tuesday, 10:30 am
  • Tales for Twos and Threes, Every Tuesday, 10:30 am
  • Senior Fitness Fridays, Every Friday 10:00 pm
  • Chess Instruction for Younger Children, Every Thursday at 10:15 am
  • Chess Instruction for Older Children, Every Wednesday at 6:30 pm
  • Chess Club, Every Monday at 5:30 pm (except Monday, February 18th)
  • Story Time With Crafts, Every Thursday, 10:30 am

Check the library’s website for the particulars (target age, etc.) of each activity. The library is located at 1801 Hamlin Street NE.

Turkey Thicket Playground Overhual Update – Moving From Community Input To Concept Plans

Mayor Gray has launched the largest playground improvement project in DC history, named Play DC. Our very own Turkey Thicket Recreation Center has one of the playgrounds slated for an overhaul. We have posted earlier about surveys and meetings where Department of Parks and Recreation and the Department of General Services sought input from the community. Brooklanders definitely stepped up to the plate and gave tons of feed back. DPR is not collecting additional comments at this point, as they feel they got the input they needed from the community regarding concerns and desires for the renovation. Next, DPR will consult with playground experts to select appropriate equipment while staying true to the concept plan. The updated concept plans are posted below. Double click on the playground diagram to enlarge. The slide show contains the themes that will be utilized and sample playground equipment. There are still a lot of details to be worked out, for example, how the community garden will be managed. Many thanks to Debee Yamamoto of the Brookland Neighborhood Civic Association for keeping the community up to speed on the renovation.

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Woodridge Library Features Civil Rights Focused Programs And More This Month

Woodridge Library. Image courtesy of DC Public Library.
Woodridge Library. Image courtesy of DC Public Library.

As usual, the Woodridge Library has a lot of activities going on that appeal to a wide array of people and ages. This month there is an extra emphasis on Civil Rights programs. Here is a rundown:

  • Civil Rights Film Festival, January 14th, 6:30 pm
  • Job Seekers Walk In Clinic, January 15th, 10:00 am
  • African-American Teens & the Civil Rights Movement, January 16, 7:00 pm
  • Dr. Martin Luther King Story Time, January 17th, 10:30 am
  • Sewing With Samira – Beginning Sewing Class, January 26th, 9:30 am
  • Civil Rights Film Festival, January 28th, 6:30 pm
  • Make A Calligraphy Scroll, January 23rd, 4:00 pm
  • Make Marshmallow Snowman Popsicles, January 30th, 4:00 pm
  • Tales for Twos and Threes, Every Tuesday, 10:30 am
  • Chess Club, Every Thursday at 10:00 am, Every Monday at 5:30 pm
  • Story Time With Crafts, Every Thursday, 10:30 am

Check the library’s website for the particulars (target age, etc.) of each activity. The library is loacted at 1801 Hamlin Street NE.