Category Archives: General Neighborhood Topics

DCist Article Explores 10 Aspects Of Brookland

So, we are a little late in posting this, but we thought Brooklander’s who hadn’t seen it, would appreciate this article from the DCist that explores some of little and better known facts about our neighborhood. I like that the article looked beyond the obvious (oooh new restaurants!) and did some nice background work. From the article:

“…relatively far away from downtown corridors, giving it the feel of a small town enclaved in the big city—a feeling residents are trying strenuously to preserve. Not all (or maybe any) of its residents would call this a disadvantage, but Brookland is not an overly well-known neighborhood outside its function as the cradle of Catholic U. So let’s shine some light on these city blocks, with 10 things you may not know about Brookland.”

 

 

Sistine Chapel Choir To Perform At The Basilica This September

We are posting this a little early since we assume this will be a well attended event, so you may want to make your plans now. On Wednesday, September 20  the Sistine Chapel Choir will perform at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception at 6:00 p.m. From the event page:

For the first time in more than three decades, the Sistine Chapel Choir returns to the U.S. to perform.

This highly-accomplished group of 30 boys and 22 men sings for the Holy Father’s liturgies under the direction of Maestro Massimo Palomba. Officially called the Cappella Musicale Pontifica Sistina and affectionately known as the “Pope’s Choir,” this group is considered the most prominent and oldest choir in the world, dating back to the seventh century.

While this special event is free and open to the public, we encourage you to consider sponsorship opportunities. Become a part of the Papal Choir’s historic visit to the capital of the U.S.

There is more information about sponsorship levels on the event page. The Basilica is located at 400 Michigan Ave NE.

Shuttered Ivy City Nightclub, Love, To Become A Wine Bar And Concert Venue

Cheers!

We used the Independence Day Holiday as a catch-up time to write up some blog posts about area news we didn’t have a chance to write about earlier. This was one bit of development news we thought Brooklanders would be interested in since Ivy City is just around the corner.

Love nightclub was the largest nightclub in the city before closing in 2013. It was a fun place to go back in the day, I used to go frequently when it was called Dream. One of my favorite memories is seeing LL Cool J perform there and dancing the night away in the early 2000’s. Ahhhhh, youth. Anyway, the Washington Business Journal reported back in May that the club is slated for another incarnation:

City Winery, as we reported, is expected to include a 300- to 350-seat concert venue, winemaking operation, restaurant, bar, private event spaces, and rooftop bar. It is scheduled to open in late 2017, bringing concerts, food and wine classes, private events and dining with it…City Winery tends to book singer-songwriters, jazz musicians and other acts looking for “a listening crowd,” Dorf said previously. Upcoming acts at the New York outpost include Bruce Hornsby, Shawn Mullins and 10,000 Maniacs.

Hmmmmm….doesn’t sound like LL will be back. City Winery will be located at 1350 Okie St. NE.

Mess Hall Presents “Sip. Taste. Play.” – Event With Summer Boardwalk Carnival Theme

We thought neighbors would be interested in this local event, sounds like fun. Details below.


From the event page:

Sip. Taste. Play.

Join us Friday July 21st for a night @ the dock – Mess Hall’s reimagined loading dock. This summer boardwalk carnival party sets the tone to celebrate the launch of XII by Johanna’s Table; a once monthly pop up dinner series scattered throughout the District.

With the help of some amazing industry friends and local vendors, we are excited to treat you to unlimited flavors and fun ranging from Sommelier Michael Rovezzi’s kegged Cotton & Reed cocktails, frosé sno cones & DC Brau beer to an oyster raw bar “bathtub,” popcorn with a twist, an eight foot cheese & charcuterie presentation, an old fashioned pig roast and over a dozen eclectic passed bites inspired by global flavors.

Tickets are $59 dollars and can be purchased here.  Mess Hall is located at 703 Edgewood St, NE.

Politics And Prose Bookstore To Open Another Location Near Union Market

This is another “catch up” story, but for those Brooklanders who are avid readers and didn’t know, this is big news. This spring websites like Urban Turf shared that super-popular independent DC-based bookstore Politics and Prose will be opening another location nearby.  From the article:

The bookstore announced this morning that the new store will open near Union Market, but did not specify the store’s exact location…The release goes on to say that there will be event space attached to the store and that it will use the Dock 5 event space attached to Union Market for larger events and readings.

The new location is planned to open this coming fall.

DDOT Meeting To Discuss Monroe Street Bridge Reconstruction

Monroe Street Bridge Rendering Courtesy of DDOT

Back in May 2016, DDOT reveled its design for the overhaul of the Monroe Street Bridge which will extend the life of the bridge for another 75 years. The project will cost over  $12 Million dollars and will begin late July/early August 2017 and go on through March 2019.

Goodbye old friend!

There will be a meeting to inform the community about the project’s plans and schedule on Thursday July 20th from 6:30 -8:30 pm at Luke C. Moore High School, 1001 Monroe Street NE. You can check out project updates and other info at this website.

Brookland In Photos: Street Art Edition 17, #TentacleTuesday

Yesterday Brookland was treated to a pop-up street art piece from artist Theodore Carter. The electrical box at the corner of 9th and Monroe was adorned with his 5-foot tall tentacle sculptures. The pieces, made mostly from recycled materials, are a part of an ongoing street art project called Tentacle Tuesday that will pop up at different locations across the city during summer. Thanks for stopping through Brookland, Theodore! You can follow the project on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

A Chat with Dance Place’s New Executive Artistic Director

Christopher K. Morgan

Since 1986, Dance Place has been more than our local dance training and performance venue. It has provided the Brookland community with free artsy activities as well as after-school programs and summer camps.

This August, Dance Place founder Carla Perlo will step down after 37 years leading the organization. In early September, Dance Place will welcome its new executive artistic director, Christopher K. Morgan.

A dancer, choreographer, and arts educator, Christopher will be responsible for the Brookland area-based institution’s overall vision. He’ll also curate over 40 weeks’ worth of performances and programming.

As Christopher prepares for this next stage of his creative and professional career, we caught up with him for a chat about his background and future plans for this cultural institution.

How did dance become your artistic passion (as opposed to, say, painting)?

As a child I danced the hula and dances of Polynesia with my family. Both of my parents were born and raised in Hawai’i but had moved to Southern California during their service in the U.S. Marines. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, they gave my brothers and sisters and I the opportunity to connect to our cultural heritage through the dance and music of our ancestors.

I came to Western-influenced forms of dance (ballet, jazz, modern dance) at the age of 17. While participating in high-school theater, a choreographer suggested I take a ballet class. Recognizing a talent in me I didn’t know I had, the ballet teacher invited me to take classes from her for free. Before I knew it, I was consumed by this passion I felt for these ways of moving my body and expressing myself.

I studied in a studio throughout my senior year of high school. I had been studying dance and writing at the University of California at Irvine for two years when I was offered my first full-time job as a dancer for Malashock Dance & Company, a modern company in San Diego. I leapt at the opportunity, as dance had become my all-consuming passion – and has been ever since.

How did you first get involved with Dance Place?

I first learned of Dance Place in 1998 as a young dancer living in San Diego preparing to move to D.C. to dance for what is now The Dance Exchange. A few months later, in January of 1999, I found myself onstage at Dance Place in an evening of dancer-choreographed works.

Of course, I’ve attended many performances at Dance Place over the years, but since I began my dance company, Christopher K. Morgan & Artists, in 2011, Dance Place has played an important role in presenting our work multiple times. Most significantly, Dance Place was one of the two lead commissioners and the site for the world premiere of my 2016 work, Pōhaku, which has now toured to nine venues around the United States.

Over the last 10 years, I’ve felt a growing call to arts leadership emerging in my life, which drew me to the executive artistic director role at Dance Place. In order to achieve equity for under-represented artists, diverse representation must be at the decision-making tables. As a person who identifies with multiple marginalized groups, I take very seriously my role to serve artists, students, and audiences of all types.

What are your hopes for the future of Dance Place?

I’m approaching this new role with a philosophy of inclusivity and service, which is essentially continuing Dance Place’s existing mission. I’m excited how this evolution in my career will allow me to support and serve artists, students, and audiences.

One thing I hope for is to help Dance Place and the greater D.C. dance community increase their visibility on the national scene as an important center for dance. After all, we’re in our nation’s capital, and D.C. has the second-highest concentration of choreographers in the country. The work being presented and made here is noteworthy, and it should be recognized more.

What should the relationship be between an arts organization and its surrounding community?

Nothing exists in isolation. I like to use the image of concentric circles. The concentric circles of community Dance Place inhabits begin with the Brookland and Edgewood neighborhoods and expand from there out to D.C., and from there to the region, and from there to the nation.

Dance Place’s relationship with Brookland and Edgewood has to be strong in order for the organization’s role in the greater D.C. community to be strong. In turn, that creates an open environment that’s ready to receive what the artists who come from outside this particular community bring to our neighborhood. The circles can be porous when they’re strong, allowing ideas and information to flow inward and outward.

What do you like most about the Brookland and Edgewood neighborhoods?

As someone who’s worked at and patronized Dance Place, I’ve spent a fair amount of time in Brookland and Edgewood. It’s amazing to see how the neighborhood has evolved since I first set foot in it back in 1998. I hope it can continue to keep its long-time residents while it grows and embraces new neighbors. I’m a big fan of the nearby Busboys and Poets location, and I love grabbing a beer over at Brookland Pint and seeing the Arts Walk alive with people.

As I step into this new role, I’m looking forward to getting to know the residents and local business owners around here. In fact, if you’re reading this and want to meet, let’s do so in the neighborhood. Or better yet: Stop by a performance at Dance Place when our new season starts in the fall and say hi!

Dance Place is located at 3225 Eighth Street NE.

DDOT Oversight Meeting At CUA Thursday; Give Input On Transportation/Environmental Issues

Do you have an ongoing issue that you feel is not being adequately addressed by DC’s Department of Transportation (DDOT)? Perhaps you have complained about a traffic pattern or the lack of care for street trees and have gotten no resolution.  If so, you here is a meeting for you. The DC City Council will be holding an oversight roundtable on the DDOT this Thursday at Catholic University. The public is invited to testify – see the instructions on how to testify below the flyer. Meeting info:

DATE: July 13, 2017
TIME: 6:30 P.M.
LOCATION: Edward J. Pryzbyla Center, Great Room A
620 Michigan Avenue, NE, Washington, DC 20064
 
 From Ward 5 Councilmember McDuffie’s office:
The public is invited to testify and can sign up to do so by contacting Ms. Aukima Benjamin, Staff Assistant to the Committee on Transportation and the Environment, at (202) 724-8062 or via e-mail at abenjamin@dccouncil.us. Persons representing organizations will have five minutes to present their testimony. Individuals will have three minutes to present their testimony. Witnesses should bring eight copies of their written testimony and should submit a copy of their testimony electronically to abenjamin@dccouncil.us. to Council and Resident Inquiries

DC Punk Archive Rooftop Show At Woodridge Library This Wednesday

We thought music loving neighbors would be interested in this upcoming event showcasing DC Public Library’s DC Punk Archive collection. From the event page:

The DC Punk Archive is taking it to the roof this summer for a series of concerts outside on the 3rd floor terrace at Woodridge! Join us for a night of local music overlooking Langdon Park and learn more about the DC Punk Archive collection.

Woodridge Library is located at 1801 Hamlin Street NE.