How To Save A Neighborhood – Community Preservation Lessons From The 1960s This Thursday

Brookland Highway Protest
Photo from the Washington Area Spark Flirk Page. (Photo by Brig Cabe. Courtesy of the D.C. Public Library Washington Star Collection © Washington Post)

A meeting entitled How To Save A Neighborhood will be held this Thursday evening September 12th. The focus of the meeting is to learn about community preservation from community activists who were successful fighting an 8 lane freeway that was going to run through the center of Brookland and other neighborhoods like  Takoma Park. Current efforts to preserve neighborhoods such as Ivy City,
Barry Farms, and River Terrace will also be discussed.

We really owe a debt of gratitude to the folks who fought to keep Brookland in tact. Many of us live in homes that were slated for destruction as part of the freeway project. The picture above is of three of the homes on the 2700 block of 10th Street NE that were seized by the city in preparation of the Northeast Freeway. The picture was taken on June 21, 1969 when over 100 protestors entered the yard of the third house down. For more details of this protest, and to see more great photos from this time in Brookland history, check out this Flirk set by Washington Area Spark. (Photo by Brig Cabe. Courtesy of the D.C. Public Library Washington Star Collection © Washington Post)

The meeting will take place Thursday, September 12th, from 6:30-8:30pm at the Brooks Mansion (901 Newton St NE). There will be light refreshments from 6:00 – 6:30. From the meeting invite:

Participants include:

  • Angela Rooney, Brookland neighborhood leader in Emergency Committee on the Transportation Crisis
  • Arturo Griffiths, DC Jobs with Justice
  • Parisa Norouzi, Empower DC
  • Andria Swanson, Ivy City Civic Association
  • Derrick Nabors, Amalgamated Transit Union, Local 689
  • Moderator: John Hanrahan, writer and former executive director of The Fund for Investigative Journalism

Co-sponsored by: DC Jobs with Justice, Empower DC, Institute for Policy Studies, and Ivy City Civic Association

Lessons of the 60s is a project to record, document and archive the role of hometown DC activists in the great social justice movements between 1960 and 1975.
CONTACT: DCPROJECT60(at)gmail(dot)com or 202-234-9382

One thought on “How To Save A Neighborhood – Community Preservation Lessons From The 1960s This Thursday”

  1. These folks and others are the reason that we have so much open space today. The freeway wasn’t the only bad idea they stopped.
    we should respect their sacrifices and hard work and try to be more thoughtful of the impact on all of our neighbors of the development we allow.

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